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of environment. >> in terms of your target for next year, 2013, it seems to difficult to think about what next year will look like given we don't know what sort of bargain will be reached. hopefully there will be one eventually. your target is 1600, which would imply the 13% up side. is there anything that could happen out of the fiscal cliff negotiations that could cause you to ratchet down that expectation? >> sure. so here's the worst case scenario. we go over the cliff for an extended period of time and that a basically throws us into a global recession, a u.s. recession that bleeds into a global recession. in that case, you know, i would not necessarily be as bullish as i am today. but i actually think that we get our act together. we come up with a reasonable solution. maybe a messy kind of multistage fix. but we do get to some kind of a point of clarity come mid next year. at that point, i think what drives the market higher is that corporations who are sitting on tons of cash actually start to spend it and do something interesting and growth acreative with all the capital they've been
-on environment in a cyclical upturn. >> reporter: now, the other scenario: >> in an environment where we go off the fiscal cliff and we see continued problems on the debt side for the u.s., i think the gold price outperforms the white metals. >> reporter: gold's price will also depend on whether central banks continue to diversify their holdings into gold, and whether they implement more quantitative easing to boost growth. the outlook for platinum is a little more complicated. there have been major supply disruptions due to labor unrest in south africa, which produces nearly all of the world's platinum. it also depends on demand. >> europe is a key part of the platinum demand picture. if europe can recover, certainly that's going to bode well for platinum demand. if the price trades higher, it may affect some of the price- sensitive sectors like jewelry, like chinese jewelry demand. >> reporter: of course, many investors only buy metals for investment reasons. currently, there's over $150 billion invested in gold exchange-traded funds, an all- time high. erika miller, nbr, new york. >> tom: th
that real demand like we have in the past. >> looking to the new year, the business environment, consumer sentiment, how are things shaping up for ford? >> well, right now it looks like it's going to continue to expand. both in gdp and the industry. based especially on the second half of this year. but again, it is all going to be very dependent on what the economy does and what we do especially in the united states to create an environment where the consumer feels confident and they can purchase these decisions opinions what about europe kux turn those losses into profits. >> we have announced our plan for europe which is similar to what we did in the united states. we will bring more vehicles in to people wanting value and restructuring the operations to getack to profitability but a very, very tough situation in europe economically. >> susie: you said will you step down as c.e.o. in 2014. what do you want to accomplish before you hand over the keys of ford. >> i want to complete the development of this family of vehicles, both for ford and lincoln that are absolutely best in class. and
environment? all these special dividends. oracle is doing it now, second quarter, third quarter dividends this month so investors can get taxed at the 2012 dividend rate. >> it's bigger than that because it's not only the corporation themselves but corporate executives. cashing out options looking for preferential tax treatment there as well. that's just prudent corporate management. you can't fault them. stocks paying special dividends have been outperforming the spx in the time period since this started happening. in some ways in the convoluted way it's been a positive for the market. >> oracle is down, though o this news. >> oracle is down right now. gordon, you make a really good point. that's where the performance has been, the conditions paying these special dividends. when i see an announcement like this, you as an investor, would you buy these companies paying special dif depends to make sure the tax rate is a low rate versus what we may see in 2013? >> certainly it might be an opportunity short term, over a short horizon. i'm not sure i want to lend to those companies. i'm the bo
cash. here in the low-interest rate environment, debt financing is going to be big. >> and the large cap plays. go through those. >> verifone, a leader in electronic payment devices. this has been disrupted by new players like square and paypal and google. the stock has been hit, but our fund manager we talked to think it's been unfairly hit. any time an industry is being disrupted, that's a good opportunity. >> u.s. bancorp? >> this is an old fashioned bank. focuses on deposits and loans and wealth management. none of the other stuff that can get you into trouble. this is one our clients really liked. >> this year dividend plays have been huge. everyone is looking for income. they look to these companies that have a good yield. the two that came through here were ford and, as it happens, our majority owner comcast. >> yes. so ford, you know, the auto recovery story is pretty significant. it's still happening. cars on the road are older. the replacement rate is going to go up. with ford, it has a rock-solid balance sheet. its dividend yield, we think, could go up. comcast is interest
by the american people and your businesses and the economic environment worldwide. we should not accept going through that. you know, john engler, he and i philosophically do not agree on much -- [ laughter ] >> you know, i am just being honest about john. he ii a great politician. he comes from the other party. he is exactly right when he says the only thing that the debt ceiling is good for is destroying your credit rating. i want to send a very clear message to people here. we are not going to play that game next year. if congress in any way suggest that they will type negotiations to that feeling both and take us to the brink of default onne again, as part of a budget to go she asian, which, by the way, we have never done in our history, until we did it last year, i will not play that game. with that, let me just say, we have one path where we resolve this fairly quickly. we have some tough spending cuts. we have modest revenue increases. you get business certainty. you do what you do best. and, we then have an open running world next year to deal with a whole host of other issues like in
environment, once google has seen that new rocketship, i see no reason why google should be any different. especially since google owns android. they need to figure out how to monetize it better. something the company is doing by releasing its own line of smartphones and tablets. google is sold out until after christmas. of the growth stocks, i got to admit i like google less than i did before the bad quarter if you're trying to figure out which of these stocks worries me the most, it's google, it's become a show-me situation. how about visa and master cad? both up decently since i recommended them in october. these are both plays in the worldwide switch from paper currency to plastic. visa and mastercard both reported strong quarters in october, they have healthy balance sheets. mastercard is winning new business all over the place. and visa announced a $1 billion buyback. even though visa has a new ceo, i'm a big fan of both stocks. i think they're both candidates to offer special dividends as the year unwinds. they've got the cash for certain. then there's the sherwin williams. the sto
, that's a target-rich environment is what we refer to california. they raise taxes again. they sent the message that the unions are going to continue to control the process out there. they defeated proposition 32. they passed proposition 30 which was the increase in their taxes. so, california businessmen and women are looking at their bottom line saying, where are we going to go? other places? >> governor, is it too much of a leap to say when we do this at the federal level they leave the country, bilss can eventually leave the country. >> sure. >> but we can't seem to make the leap to say that. and i'm talking about the fiscal cliff now. i wonder if you were at 25% of gdp, if the government had grown to this size where it is right now and you were trying to figure out how to deal with it and you were in charge, would it be all about -- would the first thing you come up with be raising taxes? would not -- wouldn't you address the spending -- wouldn't you address the spending side of -- >> right. >> -- and, you know, the republicans are trying to criticize the obama proposals by say
, the ryan airs, who continue to take market share and operate in a more difficult economic environment much more so than the flag carriers. however starting to look at the flag carriers again, in particular lufthansa. the iberian side of it will drag earnings down for quite a long time. air france still has significant employment issues. and if you're looking for a relatively undervalued, company which is taking itself and do significant cost cutting which i think it will bring through, you have conglomerate discounted lufthansa. it makes it a more interesting stock. >> at a time when europe doesn't have a lot of demand strength, if we're talking about reducing capacity, that means higher ticket prices and perhaps germany being one place where businesses can afford to pay up. >> i think that it's an element of probably relatively small part of overall. these are global businesses. they need to have global growth. but that is an interesting point for next year. >>'s most important for global demand then? >> with airlines it's about oil prices, in terms of capacity and reduced capacity. and i
. at least we see a deterioration in either the global environment or at least we see domestic growth really fall off from here. as the rba made the point and one that we agree with is that there's still time for these rate cuts which we've had delivered to pass through to the economy itself. we know monetary policy takes between one and two years to have an effect. >> what if on the contrary we get better growth out of china and we see commodity prices go up again and now when we've already had all these rate cuts, is there a risk then to inflation for the country? >> i think there is. that was one thing that the rba pointed to in the november statement, then worried that underlying inflation had ticked up towards the middle of the 2% to 3% target. i think from here, if we do get a scenario like that where the u.s. fiscal issues are resolved, i think the statement the rb after the has given us today probably puts them in a good position to be able to move policy higher if they have to next year in response to higher inflation. >> so what happens to the aussie dollar now? >> well, as i said,
in this environment inevitable? >> let me just say our prayers are with president bush and i hope he has a speedy recovery. we have had cut after cut after cut in education in the last four years. in this recessionary environment most of the dollars in education are local and state dollars and we have seen 300,000 teacher layoffs, we have seen class sizes spiraling up and this is for the kids who need it most. what the federal dollars in education go for i really targeted programs like early childhood education, when we know that is important, 100,000 kids who get it now wouldn't get it. title i funds go for helping kids to learn how to read in urban areas, something that is absolutely essential. right now because of all the cuts we have had if you had mid year cuts in education like this, we see a lot of kids being hurt. connell: everybody says we need a strong military to be the united states of america but times have changed, there's more technology, the types of wars we have i have changed but me we could have a strong military few spend money in a smart way. in a similar case a lot of credit
to allocate capital then in that environment. i know george young is with us again, joining the conversation. i want to ask you the same question. go ahead, scott. how are you investing right now? >> maria, i think the best way forward is the way it's worked since the bottom of the market in 2009. risk assets are where it's at. the fed is very supportive. the consumer is back and engaged. housing is getting better. the fiscal cliff is actually constructive from the standpoint it causes people to come together and compromise because going over the cliff while we may do it for a short time period is not beneficial to anybody. it hurts everybody. >> so risk assets being, what, technology? what does that mean, technology? >> not necessarily. we would stay with dividend payers. we would also dip our toe into europe into some very high-quality, multicountry stocks there. mostly on consumer discretionary stocks as well. >> george, we haven't forgotten you yet. scott, i have a question for you. just noticed today france and germany's stock markets hit 52-week highs. we're still wringing our hands ov
that environment look like? >> i don't think that's what happens. we're not talking about taking tax rates from 35 to 50 or 60. we're talking a few percentage points. so it's uncertainty, well do i get my deductions, do i pay a hayer rate? what is my mix and until then i sit on my hands. bringing up the again the uncertainty factor. i think we get to a point where we get some sort of compromise around these things. we'll get back through a muddle through economy. not a great one but good enough one. david: the president's comments of last year notwithstanding where he was for lowering rates. rates go up in one way, shape or form. rather than spending money in the stock market where people get taxed more they think of more direct investment? more vehicles that avoid the stock market entirely and get cash directly to the companies? >> that could happen and would be good for the economy which in a perverse way would be good for the stock market as well if you see my logic. getting people to move off the dime. to say i don't need this hoard of cash frankly earning almost nothing. i need to put it to w
, business friendly environment. the opportunities are with the private sector and we understand that here in nebraska. liz: have you prepared, not one, but two budgets. one taking into account we go over the cliff and the other if we do not go over the cliff. >> i really have not looked at it that way. i am preparing a budget for the next two-year cycle. we are prepared to adjust depending on what happens at the federal level. i do want to remain cautiously optimistic that they will find a deal. put america first. liz: i am glad that you do remain cautiously optimistic. nebraska is a very important state. you yourself have held it up at certain points worried about that. there is apparently, as i understand it, we are hearing from some people that a deal could be there. >> number one, the preferred route does that. secondly, on december 4, we are having a hearing to listen to all the concerns of nebraskans. that will finish up the environmental impact statement. if they pass all of that a lot that information will be forwarded to me by the end of the year and then i will forward all that
remember to put money to work. in an environment where not people put money to work and people aren't doing anything, you get an influx of retail money. you have to commit that money to your retirement and to your kids. >> interesting. >> it's a big difference. >> btig has a note on seasonality regarding the end of the year and even december '08 was positive. how resilient the month of december is. >> funny you mention that. that was such a false tell. we thought maybe things had bottomed and then just off a cliff, not fiscal but stock right after that. it's a great note. >> meantime, as we await the opening bell this morning, we'll look at the s&p 500 at the realtime exchange on the top of your screen. big board here. >> there's the bell over at the nasdaq today, sears holdings and st. jude's children's research hospital celebrating the st. jude thanks and giving campaign. lead story involves delta and talks they say to acquire from singapore some stakes in virgin atlanta. >> we'll see what happens. they have been active. the one people are more focused on is american airlines in bankruptc
. they are building and acquiring land in this low interest rate environment which bodes well for this upswing in momentum. the question as you mentioned at what point do comparisons get so tough. first quarter 2012 was first quarter where they started to see the upswing. 45% increase in signed contracts. we're lapping that now. can we beat increases as we move on? >> it could be tough. to the extent that we're building, any momentum at the bottom here, we're still building off a small base as you know. so you could have significant growth for some time. >> everything that goes into a house. a lot of spending goes into a house. >> definitely. cramer has stocks on his list that are worthy of your attention. what does he think about them? his mad dash is coming up next. later, shares of gamestop surging from summer lows hoping to score big this holiday season. we'll talk with the ceo. let's take another look at futures as we head into this tuesday morning session. we're looking about flat. more "squawk on the street" straight ahead. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between u
in the current environment. you see explosive earnings growth. you have a top tier high quality management team. new products roll out at home depot gaining share. better pricing. which like the story going into 13. liz: could i say you see the spike around the time. hurricane. usg was heavily bought right after hurricane sandy because precisely of this but does that sustain? >> we think more important than the volume story their ability to achieve higher pricing levels. wall board is about $130 per thousand board feet. we could see that go to 145 next year. it is most inflationary single item in the building products universe. this is big driver of earnings. liz: tied to lumber or what? >> no. better pricings strategy. one price for the entire year as opposed to different prices to different customers. david: now you have a defensive pick. if you're less certain about the continued economic recovery you would pick fortune brands home and security. why? >> yes, sir. fortune brands is market share leader in plumbing. market share leader in the cabinet business. huge exposure to new residential c
where and tear on the vehicle land with a warm winter without snow and tough environment during the winter season people in need as many parts throughout this summer and the months following the winter season so as a result youths are seeing stock down 3% but had boys came out with some numbers and you're seeing these autoparts sailors under pressure. advance auto parts has been under pressure as well. those are the names we are watching. your customers, less demand for the parts. liz: thank you very much. $1 billion trade was par for the course from a next guest. for five years he was head, $10 billion pension fund named no. one in pension funds in 2010 and now he has made a move backed the private sector co founding his own company but only investing in a single state. so confident in his state he called the bid germany or china of the u.s.. he is the founding partner, steven leblanc. i find your situation so fascinating, you killed in the pension fund world and now it is like you switched sides because people use to come and sell you on their ideas so you would invest in them
it will be the disconnect between economics and markets we continue to be in an environment where people don't have a great many opses. that's why these options that look so threatening action they reverse so quickly. as long as that continues to be the case. they're going to -- >> it's very simple. last night it came out that. >> i'm going to make it simple here, not for the viewers. they came out and ticked four tea party members. that took them -- some republicans are willing to adopt a much more done scilla torrie approach. that's what's driving the market. it's going to continue to drive the market. >> you're saying this is cliff driven? >> absolutely. ivities market wasn't doing all that much. the president made some comments today in front of the business roundtable. all of a sudden, we start to do explode to the up side a bit. guys, i know the music is playing, but there's a look at hewlett-packard. up 4%, pete. >> absolutely. >> there are areas you talk about, last thing is technical, look at the xlf. >>> up next, the probability that lawmakers will defy if the odds, and hammer out a fiscal cliff.
. >> in this environment we are boot about the to embark upon it because i don't think the cliff is a solution or no solution or a binary in that regard. what is the right multiple in the world that we are about to embark on with the europe that is probably a five to ten year recession. i think the u.s. is at best slogging through things here. i would make an argument that maybe the right multiple is 12 or so. if you throw in earnings of 95 to 100 you have an s&p that is significantly lower. >> rallies during the last phase of the market have peaked out around 14 times earnings. it is up from here in terms of a forward multiple. i don't see why we have to start applying a discount to what we have been seeing in terms of peak multiples given what we have been through. do you think that the uncertainty has peaked or is ahead of us? the maximum uncertainty. >> i would make the argument it is potentially forward but i think a lot of people would disagree. >> markets don't just pick a multiple like fisher price. the low multiple in the 1970s when you had slow growth and rising inflation was seven t
to the volatility. that's the theme for the next couple of weeks. we are going to see a very volatile environment until we get a resolution. so in the short-term, you're kind of trading range bound in the market. i think you want to take advantage of the extremes. so into these big positive moves, you take a little off. it's not a bad thing to take profits and to have cash. i do think that when you see the market pull back and you see extremes in terms of on the downside, i think you want to be buying because i think once you get this fiscal cliff resolution, whenever it is, i think the markets will work higher because the underlying fundamentals in the u.s. economy are clearly improving, and you also have a stabilization or soft landing happening in china at the same time. >> david kelly, what do you want to be doing here? what's your strategy for the fiscal cliff? do you think we go over it, and what do you want to do? >> for a long-term investor, you don't try and play this one. i agree with stephanie about the market probably going higher once they get a resolution. they will get a resolution
through an environment with incredibly low interest rates, the financial sector is not making the money they once were. they need to be able to adapt and make some cuts. eventually at some point in time there will be a light at the end of the tunnel but right now is just management potentially cutting back to make sure they have got realistic numbers relative to what is going on today and tomorrow with regard to the economy. liz: only adds more fear to the market, the retail trader, the investor has been sitting on the sidelines. you know that as well as i do. e di ameritrade down, the stock down 20% since september of 2009. there was so much fear their and trading volumes of not gotten back to the heyday. what would get the retail investor off of the sidelines? >> number one, clarity. you talk about that an awful lot depended on the market place. once we get some sort of resolution in terms of what is going on with the tax structure and to tighten cuts and incremental revenues, what is happening with the whole fiscal cliff mantra? once they have an understanding of what is going on and
't think it's isolated to the two fund managers. the point is if you're in a low return environment, you can ratchet up performance in a higher quartile, the other thing is it's not just hedge funds. they're the whipping boy. it's long only funds, they want to get that morningstar fifth star. on the other side of it, i used to know a guy when he ran a hedge fund he would sell into the markup and buy it back the next day which is great if you're not a taxable fund because he knew it was a hark wrup so this story is as old as lincoln getting shot at ford theater. i don't think there's anything here, it's very difficult to prove. >> of all of the street's top strategists, tom lee could nail the number on where the s&p will close out 2012. his prediction of 14,030 is looking better by the day. tom welcome, good to see you again. >> thanks. >> how does that factor in? i don't know if you heard geithner on our air yesterday with steve liesman but sounded like a guy prepared to go cliff diving. >> i did hear that and you know, that's not very constructive talk because at the end of the day, you
steve jobs feel about the current environment as it is right now at apple? >> well, again, i'm not inside of apple. i'm outside of apple looking at it. >> but you knew the way he thought about the world, and -- >> sure. steve jobs lived in a world of black and white. no compromises, perfectionist, he believed that you had to keep pushing the edges of innovation. and apple is still doing that. what apple is doing right now is it's building out the follow-on evolution very successful products like the ipad. now we have the ipad mini. so i think apple has got a few years of being able to do that. at some point, it's got to do something beyond that. >> john, there have been some notable stumbles in apple's past and in the recent past they have been able to surmount them and push them aside. what do you think is the biggest risk, whether product risk or execution risk in china, et cetera. if it you're long apple, what is the one thing that maybe makes you somewhat cautious going into the next year to 18 months? >> well, it's certainly not supply chain. apple knows how to run supp
's the asset that looks most bond friendly in a bond friendly environment and on a pullback i will go back to full share size. >> these companies are in our top three trades. gold breaks below a key technical level. we're going to go to the pits to find out if it's a sign of even more selling to come. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. i've been a superintendent for 30 some years at many different park service units across the united states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. ♪ [ male announcer ] 'tis the season to discover the kid in all of us. enjoy free shipping and great values on your holiday shopping from l.l. b
do you do with all this in an environment you're not sure with? rely on the risk reward. focus on the down side. >> time for our traders to face off on one of the biggest stock stories of the day. yum, a major china play. falling sharply after warning sales in that country will be much worse than expected. is it time to bail or buy on the dip? one stock two opinions. let's debate it. what do you do with this one? >> i think it is an opportunity. i haven't stepped in yet today. i was looking. joe told me earlier he had. i still like the fact they gave their full-year guidance the same as it had been. talking about their growth being 10% not 14% as far as earnings per share. i like what they also have told us in china as far as the growth strategy. they're going to continue to expand some of the stores, 700 more stores are going into china. i think for all these reasons the ceo also pointed out china will be strong. they still consider that to be their big growth area and it will be strong. >> this is a big story. >> it's a huge story. it's not a little miss in china. they were s
is likely to be in an environment where developed economies are all experiencing central banks trying to weaken their currency. >> i just want to break in here as people can see the debt go at the bottom of our screen. a man who ran nbc universal has been officially named the -- at turner and mr. zucker taking that job that has been reporteded on the last couple of days as something that is very likely, it has now been confirmed, replacesing jim wolton who has reported to be in that job. i'm just reading through the memo. >> so let's marry what you said about next year to what you can do right now. if you're going to buy suppositions in certain areas, a lot of these high dividend payers, stocks that have gained a lot this year, what do you buy now in preparation for a run next year? >> we really like large multinationals that can move resources around the globe. the strength in economies, the growth in the world is happening in the emerging world. we're very focused here in the u.s. on u.s. relations and trade with other countries, but trade is now happening, south-south trade, you ha
left, let's talk about the current environment. what are you hearing from a lot of the senior executives that are asking for your advice or if you're in a board room or chatting with them especially in terms of the fiscal cliff and concern about making big decisions or lack thereof and not putting money at it. >> the interesting part is talk about the fiscal cliff is the talk about the talk about the fiscal cliff. i don't think people are as concerned as the level of chatter that goes around. i think the chatter is more than the concern. the fiscal cliff just happens to be a preset deal on a scale of one to ten. it's a deal that is possible as outcome. i think what the country should hope for is that we come up with a better deal. business wants the rules. i understand why business is very much do a deal. do a something. because a business then can make their plans around that. if a marginal tax rate goes up too high here, they'll put a plant somewhere else. you can make those decisions. they want to know the rules. >> know the rules of the road. >> there's an america out ther
are smith travel, if you look at those numbers, it's a very positive environment. the fiscal cliff will affect people when employment gets affected. this is a real issue. if you see something occurring with employment, we're sensitive, we're monitoring, we represent the folks that are going to be most affected if they don't do their job in washington. we're obviously concerned about it. if they deal with it, which we think they will. we think that next year should be pretty positive. >> meanwhile big party tonight? >> big party tonight, big party last night. >> that's what the city's all about. >> we'll be opening white plains in may, it will be a little warmer than it was up there last night. it's very exciting to see those hotels get done. 1,000 jobs for the city. >> you see at the bottom of your screen, nat gas inventory. >> listen natural gas prices are extending their gains from yet, after that 4% rally that we saw. we're looking at resistance perhaps around the 4.75 level. we saw a natural gas level that was certainly not what analysts were expectings. 65 billion cubic feet w
. they could greatly benefit first maintaining a growth friendly business environment, and they could greatly benefit from reinventing their production structure, upgrading quality, and redistricting their exports towards strongly growing markets. innovation is crucial in this respect. this means for a start that where profit margins are restored, they should serve to fund research and development to higher extent. but innovation potential is not always translated into actual marketable employment creating and growth sustaining innovation. what is key in translating potential is the regime of economic incentives. and it is indeed this system of economic incentives that the current waiver of structural reforms in the euro area is addressing. central challenge is to set conditions so that the skills of the labor force especially of our young people can be profitably employed in competitive firms or in the new enterprises that will go on to set up. in this vain, removing rigidity clearly races the potential for growth and job creation. and this of course, the resumption of growth, is fundamental
that are on average 11.1 years of age that are really driving car sales. in this low interest rate environment, this is the other big ticket item. >> how are people going to fund their purchases? you have an 11-year-old car, how are they funding the replacement of it? >> well, the availability of credit has improved dramatically over the last eight months or so. and we're even seeing people with bumps in their credit history, subprime borrowers, getting more acceptances of their car loans. and of course there are a lot of incentivized interest rates from the manufacturer's financing arms out there, as well. the overall softness in the european market and with japan in recession, we think we'll see likely more incentives from manufacture are ers for customer the coming months because they have capacity they're not using for those other market. so they will be targeting this u.s. market and the consumer is in a pretty good mood. part of that we believe is the stabilization of home prices which is the basic net egg for most middle class americans. >> it would seem whatever's going on where you ar
environment again and really if you look at the economy, we're probably going back to the '90 style economy where you had 3%, 3.5% was really good growth. 2% growth which we're experiencing right now is pretty good. full employment might be 5.5, 6% like the old days. and i think with that being said, we've got to to get a little bit closer to those numbers to really have the economy start to take off. and i don't think we're that far in there. >> any much those numbers we would take. i don't know whether we are or not. wishful thinking for cantor. certainly would help you guys. why didn't you like fighting irish? >> they were on tv every week when i was a child and i'd like to see alabama win. >> alabama won last year. >> that's okay. all right. thank you. see you later. >>> in fact in some of the squawk sports news this morning, dallas beating philadelphia in sunday night nfl game. 38-33. tony romo threw three touchdown passes to break troy aikman's career franchise record. and the jets beat the cardinals 7-6. new york scoring the lone touchdown after mark sanchez was benched with tim tebo
'll get. >> you know what, i think the environment, as you look out to next year, is really difficult, ross. i mean, you don't really know what is going to come out of the u.s. fiscal cliff, how damaging potentially that can be to u.s. confidence, u.s. activity. things seem to be holding up fairly well in china. but i think there is still going to be some concerns about the whole performance of the asian economy and whether that can actually pick up next year. and then, of course, in the eurozone itself, we seem to be mending the problems progressively and taking out the tail risks, which i think is good and that is the bottom line that investors should take going further forward, but at the same time, there are some elements that you can have. if you do a forecast, in a way you could come up with something like 1% quotes for next year, but at the same time, you have to be conscious that we've had such a battery of downside impact, downside negative news coming through really for all economists in the western world in the last few years. you have to be very cognizant of those. >> i th
not a cause for celebration. still a difficult operating environment. under the former chancellor's plan, we would have been borrowing less in the next three years. because the government has failed to get our economy growing and because the policies have pushed us into recent double dip recession, they'll be pr rowing 212 billion pounds more than they planned. put that in context, that is the equivalent of what we in the uk will be spending this financial year on health, transport and defense in aggregate. >> you were talking quite rightly about the low level of he have credit growth in the uk, which has obviously been a feature of this period. but there's a question of what's cause and what's effect there. the banks will tell you that that problem is not so much availability of credit, there's credit demand and even in the mortgage sector which under normal circumstances you might have been eager to see people borrow money. we're seeing net repayments for the first time for a very, very long time. so you can take the economy to water, but you can't make it drink. how do you respond. >> i s
universities, one a competition for grant money from the u.s. environment protection agency. each student group will be awarded $15,000. san jose state's project involves researching sustainable inexpensive building components. stanford's group wants to develop a low-cost colorrennation device to -- chlorination drinking device. groups will go to washington, d.c. to present their findings and the winner of that competition gets a second grant up to $90,000. >>> local democrats are asking the president to create a new no-drilling ocean preserve in california. the proposed executive order would ban offshore drilling in a 50-mile-long area from sonoma to mend see know county. the "-- men so dino -- mendocino county. lawmakers, including senator barbara boxer, and lin wasly, are spear heading the drive -- lin wasly, are -- lynn woosley, are spearheading the program. >>> there's higher rates from the p.u.c. the city says customers will pay between $11 and $95 more than the previous hike. customers will be able to opt out and have pg&e supply their power again? the operators of the oldest repsyche --
in an increasingly competitive environment? >> well, we try to stay ahead of the game. we have collections. i think one of the big trademarks of our product is the quality and intensity of colors, of course, joe kohler has been tremendous for us. the whole joe market opened up the professional market. we stay true to the course. when they get opi on their nails, you know it is quality. sometimes they would pay a little bit more to get a better product. that is where the opi name comes in. connell: we talk about the tax rates going up at the end of the year, potentially, for everybody. highly likely they will go up for the wealthiest of americans. in california, the top tax rate will be close to 52%. are you comfortable paying taxes at that level? >> comfortable or not, that is the price of living in california. i think there is a responsibility that each one of us has. we have to pay our fair share. it is what it is. dagen: okay. [ laughter ] >> i do not think we should get bogged down in the present, it is more important to go along with business and make more money so we can pay the taxes. dagen:
to part time, in the environment where we're looking at 8% unemployment, this isn't about solving the economy. it's very obvious now. stuart: all politics all the time, it is redistribution, it's neo-socialism, forget what it will actually do to economic growth, no, what will it do for my political legacy? >> that's the point. it's advancing the causes of bureaucracy and dependency. so you have people who they no long very a full-time job. they have a part-time job. they need more government benefits you need a bigger bureaucracy to administer it. i'm not a big government fan. if you catch say the euro train on the continent two hours from brussels, that's pretty good, if you want government spending, here's something to show for it. there's nothing to show for it here except the department of bureaucratic compliance. charles: this was a big beef with the stimulus package. they are like -- they built a bridge that took me to stuart and it took them two years to do it. charles: hold on a second. i have to go to nicole, a bank announced they are cutting 11,000 positions? they are re
americans who saved it do not have enough for environment. lori: should average investors follow the institutions? >> yeah, you know, one of the things we are seeing is a lot of institutions have held off or have looked at managing risk and mitigating in their own portfolios. you are looking at this longer-term investing. writing to the store. looking at structures that allow you to mitigate risk and have better sleeping at night. you cannot fund a retirement by earning a half of a percent of 1% and a stable money market fund or bond. you will need to take some risk. sure. i was just going to come in with a risk. should i go risk on all the way and really go crazy and put in some, you know -- [talking over each other] >> it all depends on what your circumstances are. if you have some longer-term horizons, you should be looking out what type of risk you can look at in the portfolio. the big dynamic change has been risks moving from i do not want to miss the upside to a game i want to watch and protect my principal. it is about risk budgeting now more than the way i need to allocat
. this fuel is lauded as great for the environment and a good thing. some manufacture you ares are saying guess what, it will void your warranty if you use this fuel in certain cars . what do you make of this whole thing? >> melissa, what happened this is good example where the government mandates picking winners and losers and forcing decisions on the part of consumers which could be harmful to consumers. comment by aaa coming out to say the decision to allow for e15 blend or 15% of their gasoline to be derived from biofuels, in this case ethanol, the auto manufacturers have said they will not honor their warranties if people use this fuel which is potentially harmful to their engines. the automakers researched this. melissa: it is amazing because they say i void your warranty. >> yeah. melissa: can you imagine you buy the fuel and put it among the manufacturers, chrysler, gm, toyota, especially in older vehicles and look at your manufacturers website if you're in this group, what happens with the e15 the fuel separates and ethanol in there is highly corrosive to your engine. is this new
. >> is it possible to ever get back to that in this environment? >> it is. you have a lot of problems with the piece. >> do you briyou believe if you rote deficit -- two different ways. you either keep the government that you have and pay for it by raising taxes, or you kind of leave taxes where they are and you shrink government down to where it pays for it. does it matter for the future and for growth which way you do it in your view? >> it does. if you put it all into like a tightening, so how much tightening occurs in the economy that would slow the economy, it's far better to actually reduce government spending than it is to actually raise taxes. >> although that hurts the economy, too. >> everything hurts the economy. so it's a question of which is most -- or least harmful and that tends to be cutting government spending. >> but i do think it's -- >> although tim geithner would disagree with me. >> one side wants to keep the government and entitlements like we have it. and the other side wants to take away all the excess government -- >> i think both sides agree that you need to do both. just
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